TARGETED NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR ANTICANCER DRUG DELIVERY: CURRENT ISSUE AND CHALLENGE

  • Manish Kumar Research Scholar, College of Pharmacy, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology and Medical Sciences, Village-Pachama, District- Sehore, Madhya Pradesh-466001, India.
  • Hemant K. Sharma Dean & Professor, College of Pharmacy, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology and Medical Sciences, Village-Pachama, District- Sehore, Madhya Pradesh-466001, India.

Abstract

The main aim of nonmaterials is optimization on site of action at tumors cells as well least toxicity by its formulation. Only to progress the biodistribution of neoplasia drugs, nanoparticles are designed for optimal size and surface individuality to expand their flow time within the blood circulation. They are also proficient to carry their laden active drugs to cancer cells by using the single functional changes of tumors, as like their improved permeability and preservation result and the tumor microenvironment. In this study report, we have discussed the current status of nanoparticles developed as targeting delivery systems for anticancer drugs.


Keywords: Cancer, Drug Delivery, Nanomedicine, Chemotherapy, Liposome 

Keywords: Cancer, Drug Delivery, Nanomedicine, Chemotherapy, Liposome

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Author Biographies

Manish Kumar, Research Scholar, College of Pharmacy, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology and Medical Sciences, Village-Pachama, District- Sehore, Madhya Pradesh-466001, India.

Research Scholar, College of Pharmacy, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology and Medical Sciences, Village-Pachama, District- Sehore, Madhya Pradesh-466001, India.

Hemant K. Sharma, Dean & Professor, College of Pharmacy, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology and Medical Sciences, Village-Pachama, District- Sehore, Madhya Pradesh-466001, India.

Dean & Professor, College of Pharmacy, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology and Medical Sciences, Village-Pachama, District- Sehore, Madhya Pradesh-466001, India.

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How to Cite
Kumar, M., & Sharma, H. K. (2018). TARGETED NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR ANTICANCER DRUG DELIVERY: CURRENT ISSUE AND CHALLENGE. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(5), 23-27. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i5.1882