KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF PHARMACOVIGILANCE AMONG OPERATORS OF PHARMACIES AND PATENT MEDICINE STORES IN SOKOTO METROPOLIS, NIGERIA

  • KJ Awosan Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.
  • A Yunusa Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.
  • I Yakubu Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.
  • KK Yunusa Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.
  • AM Auwal Department of Pharmacology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Abstract

Background: The weak pharmacovigilance (PV) systems in many developing countries of the world have undoubtedly hampered the global quest for safe drug use. Operators of pharmacies and patent medicine stores have important roles to play in developing the PV systems in these countries being the main source of medicines for acute conditions. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of pharmacovigilance among operators of pharmacies and patent medicine stores in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria.


Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 249 operators of pharmacies and patent medicine stores selected by multistage sampling technique. Data were collected with a set of pretested self- administered, semi-structured questionnaire.


Results: Although, the majority, 173 (69.5%) of the 249 respondents were aware of PV, less than a fifth (17.3%) had good knowledge of it. Despite positive attitude towards PV, only about half, 56 (52.3%) of the 107 respondents that had observed adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in clients reported; and of these, only about a tenth (12.8%) formally reported to the organization in charge of PV. The most commonly cited reasons for non-reporting were that they didn’t know where and how to report (51.0%), and unavailability of reporting forms (23.5%).


Conclusion: This study showed poor knowledge of PV and sub-optimal ADRs reporting despite positive attitude towards it by operators of pharmacies and patent medicine stores in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. Sensitization of the populace and training of healthcare providers on PV and ADRs reporting are necessary for revitalizing the PV system in Sokoto State, Nigeria.


Keywords: Pharmacovigilance, knowledge, attitude, practice

Keywords: Pharmacovigilance, knowledge, attitude

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Author Biographies

KJ Awosan, Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

A Yunusa, Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

I Yakubu, Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

KK Yunusa, Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

AM Auwal, Department of Pharmacology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

Department of Pharmacology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria.

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How to Cite
Awosan, K., Yunusa, A., Yakubu, I., Yunusa, K., & Auwal, A. (2018). KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF PHARMACOVIGILANCE AMONG OPERATORS OF PHARMACIES AND PATENT MEDICINE STORES IN SOKOTO METROPOLIS, NIGERIA. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(5), 358-364. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i5.1881