CHLOROFORM FRACTION OF PARKIA JAVANICA BARK POSSESSES ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST MULTIDRUG RESISTANT GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA PREDOMINANTLY FOUND IN SKIN WOUND

  • S Saha Molecular Genetics and Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura-799022, India.
  • P Karmakar Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S. C. Mallick Road, Kolkata, West Bengal-700032, India.
  • Samir Kumar Sil Molecular Genetics and Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura-799022, India.

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of Parkia javanica against gram negative MDR bacterial strains which are predominantly found in skin wound. Methods: The 5 different solvent fractions of Parkia javanica were screened for antibacterial activity against gram negative multi drug resistant bacterial strains namely Enterobacter aerugenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia by serial dilution technique. Growth kinetics study was performed and percentage of ROS production was measured by NBT reduction assay. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were obtained with a range of IC100 0.08-0.31 mg/ml in case of MDR bacterial strains. The lag phase of all extract treated bacteria is extended compared to untreated cells. The normalized % of ROS is increased in presence of Parkia javanica extract. Conclusions: This study suggests that, chloroform fraction of Parkia javanica possesses promising antimicrobial substances which are having activity against MDR bacterial strains and ROS induced bacterial cell damage could be the possible mediator of its antimicrobial activity.


Keywords:   Parkia javanica, antibacterial activity, MDR bacterial strains, growth curve, ROS.

Keywords: Parkia javanica, antibacterial activit, MDR bacterial strains, growth curve, ROS

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Author Biographies

S Saha, Molecular Genetics and Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura-799022, India.

Molecular Genetics and Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura-799022, India.

P Karmakar, Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S. C. Mallick Road, Kolkata, West Bengal-700032, India.

Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S. C. Mallick Road, Kolkata, West Bengal-700032, India.

Samir Kumar Sil, Molecular Genetics and Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura-799022, India.

Molecular Genetics and Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Human Physiology, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar, Tripura-799022, India.

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How to Cite
Saha, S., Karmakar, P., & Sil, S. (2018). CHLOROFORM FRACTION OF PARKIA JAVANICA BARK POSSESSES ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST MULTIDRUG RESISTANT GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA PREDOMINANTLY FOUND IN SKIN WOUND. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(5), 184-189. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i5.1847