Phytochemical analysis, antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of Lophopetalum wightianum Arn. (Celastraceae)

  • Nitish A Bharadwaj Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
  • K.K. Karthik Udupa Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
  • S Karthik Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
  • K.S. Vinayaka Department of Botany, Kumadvathi First Grade College, Shikaripura-577427, Karnataka, India
  • T.R. Prashith Kekuda Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India

Abstract

Objectives: Lophopetalum wightianum Arn. (Celastraceae) is a lofty evergreen tree reaching around 40m in height. The present study was carried out to investigate antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of leaf and bark extract of L. wightianum.

Methods: The shade dried and powdered leaf and bark were extracted by maceration process using methanol. Extracts were screened for phytoconstituents present by standard protocols. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of extracts was evaluated by agar well diffusion and poisoned food technique respectively. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH radical scavenging and ferric reducing assays.

Results: Phytochemicals viz. alkaloids, flavonoids, sterols, saponins and triterpenoids were detected in both leaf and bark extracts. Inhibitory activity against test bacteria of bark extract was marked than leaf extract. Bark extract displayed more or less similar activity against test bacteria while leaf extract was more effective against Escherichia coli. In antifungal activity, leaf extract showed highest inhibitory against Bipolaris sp. than A. niger. Bark extract showed more or less similar antifungal activity against A. niger and Bipolaris sp. Bark extract scavenged DPPH radicals more efficiently with IC50 value 7.03µg/ml than leaf extract which scavenged radicals with IC50 value of 24.64µg/ml. Reducing potential exhibited by bark extract was higher when compared to leaf extract.

Conclusion: Overall, bark extract displayed marked antimicrobial and antioxidant potential. The plant is shown to contain bioactive principles with activity against pathogenic microorganisms and free radicals that cause oxidative damage.

Keywords: Lophopetalum wightianum, Maceration, Phytochemical, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Nitish A Bharadwaj, Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
K.K. Karthik Udupa, Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
S Karthik, Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
K.S. Vinayaka, Department of Botany, Kumadvathi First Grade College, Shikaripura-577427, Karnataka, India
Department of Botany, Kumadvathi First Grade College, Shikaripura-577427, Karnataka, India
T.R. Prashith Kekuda, Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S Campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India

References

1. Ravishankar B, Shukla VJ, Indian systems of medicine: A brief profile, Afr J Trad CAM, 2007; 4(3):319-337.
2. Teron R, Borthakur SK, Traditional knowledge relating to use of flora and fauna as indicators in predicting annual seasons among Karbi tribe of Assam, Indian J Tradit Know, 2009; 8(4):518-524.
3. Zhang J, Wider B, Shang H, Li X, Ernst E, Quality of herbal medicines: Challenges and solutions, Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 2012; 20(1-2):100-106.
4. Thillaivanan S, Samraj K, Challenges, constraints and opportunities in herbal medicines – A review, International Journal of Herbal Medicine, 2014; 2(1):21-24.
5. Quiroz D, Sosef M, Andel T, Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance, J Ethnopharmacol, 2016; 188:48-56.
6. Singh R, Medicinal plants: A review, Journal of Plant Sciences, 2015; 3:50-55.
7. Amuka O, Mulei JM, Gatwiri BP, A brief ethnbotanical survey of some medicinal plants used by the Kanjoo community in Meru, Advances in Biotechnology and Microbiology, 2017; 5(1):555654.
8. Punekar SA, Lakshminarasimhan P, Flora of Anshi national park, Western Ghats- Karnataka, Biosphere Publications, Pune, India, 2011, Pp 152-153.
9. Bhat GK, Flora of South Kanara (Dakshina Kannada and Udupi districts of Karnataka), Aakriti Prints, Mangalore, India, 2014, Pp 418-419.
10. Raghavendra HL, Kekuda PTR, Akarsh S, Ranjitha MC, Ashwini HS, Phytochemical analysis, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of different parts of Pleocaulus sessilis (Nees) Bremek (Acanthaceae), Int J Green Pharm, 2017; 11(2):98-107.
11. Tiwari P, Kumar B, Kaur M, Kaur G, Kaur H, Phytochemical screening and extraction: A review, Internationale Pharmaceutica Sciencia, 2011; 1(1):98-106.
12. Ajayi IA, Ajibade O, Oderinde RA, Preliminary phytochemical analysis of some plant seeds, Res J Chem Sci, 2011; 1(3):58-62.
13. Pandey A, Tripathi S, Concept of standardization, extraction and pre phytochemical screening strategies for herbal drug, J Pharmacogn Phytochem, 2014; 2(5):115-119.
14. Santhi K, Sengottuvel R, Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis of Moringa concanensis Nimmo, Int J Curr Microbiol App Sci, 2016; 5(1):633-640.
15. Cowan MM, Plant products as antimicrobial agents, Clin Microbiol Rev, 1999; 12(4):564-582.
16. Saxena M, Saxena J, Nema R, Singh D, Gupta A, Phytochemistry of medicinal plants, J Pharmacogn Phytochem, 2013; 1(6):168-182.
17. Tiwari R, Rana CS, Plant secondary metabolites: a review, International Journal of Engineering Research and General Science, 2015; 3(5):661-670.
18. Chang ST, Chen PF, Chang SC, Antibacterial activity of leaf essential oils and their constituents from Cinnamomum osmophloeum, J Ethnopharmacol, 2001; 77(1):123-127.
19. Freile ML, Giannini F, Pucci G, Sturniolo A, Rodero L, Pucci O, Balzareti V, Enriz RD, Antimicrobial activity of aqueous extracts and of berberine isolated from Berberis heterophylla, Fitoterapia, 2003; 74(7-8):702-705.
20. Wallace RJ, Antimicrobial properties of plant secondary metabolites, Proc Nutr Soc, 2004; 63(4):621-629.
21. Cushnie TP, Lamb AJ, Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids, Int J Antimicrob Agents, 2005; 26(5):343-356.
22. Compean KL, Ynalvez RA, Antimicrobial activity of plant secondary metabolites: A review, Research Journal of Medicinal Plants 2014; 8(5):204-213.
23. Farrag ESH, Moharam MHA, Ziedan EH, Effect of plant extracts on morphological and pathological potential of seed-borne fungi on cucumber seeds, Int J Agric Technol, 2012; 9(1):141-149.
24. Kekuda PTR, Akarsh S, Darshini SM, Prafulla D, Raghavendra HL, Antiradical and antimicrobial activity of Atylosia lineata Wt. and Arn, Sci Technol Arts Res J, 2015; 4(3):180-183.
25. Bhardwaja J, Setha MK, Gogoi R, Evaluation of antifungal efficacy of plant extracts against seed-borne fungi Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Int J Curr Sci, 2015; 18:49-54.
26. Lakshmeesha TR, Sateesh MK, Vedashree S, Sofi MS, Antifungal activity of some medicinal plants on Soybean seed-borne Macrophomina phaseolina, J Appl Pharm Sci, 2013; 3(2):84-87.
27. Chung Y, Chien C, Teng K, Chou S, Antioxidative and mutagenic properties of Zanthoxylum ailanthoides Sieb & zucc, Food Chem, 2006; 97:418-425.
28. Marinova G, Batchvarov V, Evaluation of the methods for determination of the free radical scavenging activity by DPPH, Bulg J Agric Sci, 2011; 17:11-24.
29. Martysiak-Żurowska D, Wenta W, A comparison of ABTS and DPPH methods for assessing the total antioxidant capacity of human milk, Acta Sci Pol, 2012; 11(1):83-89.
30. Valantina RS, Neelamegam P, Selective ABTS and DPPH- radical scavenging activity of peroxide from vegetable oils, International Food Research Journal, 2015; 22(1):289-294.
31. Ferreira ICFR, Baptista P, Vilas-Boas M, Barros L, Free-radical scavenging capacity and reducing power of wild edible mushrooms from northeast Portugal: Individual cap and stipe activity, Food Chem, 2007; 100:1511–1516.
32. Gulcin I, Topal F, Sarikaya SBO, Bursal E, Bilsel G, Goren AC, Polyphenol contents and antioxidant properties of Medlar (Mespilus germanica L.), Rec Nat Prod, 2011; 5(3):158-175.
33. Jayanthi P, Lalitha P, Reducing power of the solvent extracts of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms, Int J Pharm Pharm Sci, 2011; 3(3):126-128.
34. Ahmed D, Khan MM, Saeed R, Comparative analysis of phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidant and antibacterial potential of methanolic, hexanic and aqueous extracts from Adiantum caudatum Leaves, Antioxidants, 2015; 4:394-409.
Statistics
29 Views | 81 Downloads
How to Cite
Bharadwaj, N. A., Karthik Udupa, K., Karthik, S., Vinayaka, K., & Prashith Kekuda, T. (2018). Phytochemical analysis, antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of Lophopetalum wightianum Arn. (Celastraceae). Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(4), 302-307. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i4.1796