ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITIES OF SALIX AEGYPTIACA BARK EXTRACT ATTRIBUTE TO ITS ANTICANCER EFFICACY

  • Mohd Nauman School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
  • Lalita Lalita School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
  • Raosaheb K. Kale School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
  • Paulraj Rajamani School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
  • Rana P. Singh School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India

Abstract

Salix aegyptiaca has been used traditionally from the ancient time for its beneficial effects. The protective action of this plant is not well understood so far. Oxidative stress and inflammation are generally linked with carcinogenesis. In the present study, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of hydroethanolic bark extract of Salix aegyptiaca have been studied. The results of DPPH assay indicated the free radical scavenging ability of the bark extract (2-20 µg/ml). The inhibition of ˙OH radical induced damage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by the extract (20 µg/ml) depicted its antioxidant property. This bark extract (5-800 µg/ml) exhibited the anti-inflammatory activity against heat induced protein denaturation. The medicinal property of S. aegyptiaca could be attributed to its free radicals scavenging ability and anti-inflammatory activity. Further, the extract (5-40 µg/ml) has shown anticancer activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. However, the underlying mechanisms related to its anticancer effect need to be explored.

Keywords: Salix aegyptiaca, antioxidants, inflammation and hepatocellular carcinoma.

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Author Biographies

Mohd Nauman, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
Lalita Lalita, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India

School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India

School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India

Raosaheb K. Kale, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
Paulraj Rajamani, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
Rana P. Singh, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India
School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067, India

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How to Cite
Nauman, M., Lalita, L., Kale, R. K., Rajamani, P., & Singh, R. P. (2018). ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITIES OF SALIX AEGYPTIACA BARK EXTRACT ATTRIBUTE TO ITS ANTICANCER EFFICACY. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(4), 272-276. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i4.1786