ANTI-CANCER HERBLE DRUGS: AN OVERVIEW

  • Sonali R Pawar Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
  • Sampada S Jangam Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
  • Santosh A. Waghmare Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207

Abstract

"Cancer" is the term we give to a large group of diseases that vary in type and location but have one thing in common: abnormal cells growing out of control. It continues multiplying uncontrollably and the result of this accumulation of abnormal cells is a mass of cells called a "cancer". The Plant Kingdom produces naturally occurring secondary metabolites which are being investigated for their anticancer activities leading to the development of new clinical drugs. With the success of these compounds that have been developed into staple drugs for cancer treatment new technologies are emerging to develop the area further. New technologies include nanoparticles for Nano-medicines which aim to enhance anticancer activities of plant-derived drugs by controlling the release of the compound and investigating new methods for administration. This review discusses the demand for naturally-derived compounds from medicinal plants and their properties which make them targets for potential anticancer treatments. The purpose of this brief review is to assemble current literature on some herbal drugs and to focus on their beneficial roles and drug targets in cancer therapy and chemoprevention.

Keywords: 20 Herbal drugs, Cancer, Cell cycle

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Author Biographies

Sonali R Pawar, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
Sampada S Jangam, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
Santosh A. Waghmare, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, JSPM’s Charak College of Pharmacy and Research, Wagholi, Pune, Maharashtra, India-412207

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How to Cite
Pawar, S. R., Jangam, S. S., & Waghmare, S. A. (2018). ANTI-CANCER HERBLE DRUGS: AN OVERVIEW. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(4), 48-58. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i4.1749