A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY ON EBOLA (EBOV) VIRUS: A THREAT TO HUMAN EXISTENCE

  • Mani Taneja Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India
  • Anu Malik Assistant Professor, RP Institute of Information and Technology, Bastara, Karnal, Haryana, India
  • Manisha Singh Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India
  • Doli Das Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

Abstract

Ebola hemorrhagic disease is a severe, an acute, often fatal disease in humans and non-humans which is caused by infection with a virus of family: Filoviridae, genus: Ebola virus. The incubation period of ebola virus disease (EVD) varies from 2-21 days, with an observed average of 8 to 10 days by following introduction of Ebola virus in the human population through animal-to-human transmission, person-to-person transmission by direct contact body fluids/secretions of infected persons. The most common symptoms include sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and at advanced stage both internal and external bleeding. The virus is transmitted by contact with body fluids of infected humans or animals is primarily responsible for the virus outbreak. Fruit bats are considered as the natural reservoirs of the virus. The most general assays used for antibody detection are direct IgG and IgM  ELISAs and IgM capture ELISA. An IgM or rising IgG titer (four-fold) contributes to strong presumptive diagnosis. Currently neither a licensed vaccine nor an approved treatment is available for human use. In this review, the Ebola virus: life cycle and pathogenicity in humans, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy and their prevention is summarized.

Keywords: Filoviridae, Ebola, Outbreak, Transmission, Symptoms, Hemorrhagic fever.

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Author Biographies

Mani Taneja, Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

Anu Malik, Assistant Professor, RP Institute of Information and Technology, Bastara, Karnal, Haryana, India

Assistant Professor, RP Institute of Information and Technology, Bastara, Karnal, Haryana, India

 

Manisha Singh, Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

Doli Das, Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

Gurugram Global College of Pharmacy, Farrukhnagar, Gurugram, Haryana, India

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Taneja M, Malik A, Singh M, Das D. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY ON EBOLA (EBOV) VIRUS: A THREAT TO HUMAN EXISTENCE. JDDT [Internet]. 14May2018 [cited 1Dec.2021];8(3):124-32. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/1688