EVALUATING THE ANTI-MICROBIAL EFFECT OF EUGENOL EXTRACTED FROM OCIMUM SANCTUM

  • Piyali Basak School of Biosciences and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032
  • Pritha Paul Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India-700107
  • Torsha Kundu Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India-700107
  • Priyadarshini Mallick School of Biosciences and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India-700032

Abstract

Eugenol is a phytochemical present in herbal and medicinal plants. It possess anti tubercular, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic properties. Commercial or synthesised eugenol is used extensively in the market nowadays. The aim is to evaluate the anti-microbial property of eugenol extracted from both the powder and leaf samples of Ocimum sanctum (tulsi) and to have a comparative analysis of the synthetic eugenol and the naturally extracted eugenol from tulsi leaves. The eugenol is extracted from tulsi leaves by steam distillation. For quantitative analysis of the natural eugenol, HPLC and UV Spectroscopy are performed with commercial eugenol as the reference. While Raman Spectroscopy is performed for qualitative analysis of the constituents of tulsi leaves. Membrane casting is done with eugenol as the core ingredient and porosity of the membrane is checked by SEM. Further microbial assay is performed to evaluate the effect of eugenol. From the results it can be concluded that the eugenol extracted from the powder and fresh leaves of tulsi has anti-microbial effect and the membrane composed of eugenol has the capability to retain the eugenol.

Keywords: Ocimum sanctum, eugenol, anti-microbial, membrane,anti-microbial.

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Author Biographies

Piyali Basak, School of Biosciences and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032

School of Biosciences and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032

Pritha Paul, Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India-700107

Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India-700107

Torsha Kundu, Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India-700107

Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, Kolkata, India-700107

Priyadarshini Mallick, School of Biosciences and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India-700032
School of Biosciences and Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India-700032

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1.
Basak P, Paul P, Kundu T, Mallick P. EVALUATING THE ANTI-MICROBIAL EFFECT OF EUGENOL EXTRACTED FROM OCIMUM SANCTUM. JDDT [Internet]. 12Sep.2016 [cited 20Oct.2020];6(5):1-. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/1307